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Take Inspiration From These Celebrities

If you’re looking for some willpower-boosting words now that we’re well into February to help you stick to those New Year resolutions, look no further than our best-loved celebs.

We look back at the best wellbeing advice and thoughts of the well-known, and discover they can say the most inspiring things sometimes…

Model Twiggy on sticking to your guns:

“My parents always told me, ‘Stay true to yourself,’ and I think I have. I’ve never allowed myself to be forced to do things I didn’t want to do and I don’t suffer fools gladly.”

Radio presenter Sara Cox on dodgy perms and being herself:

“I never dreamt then that I could eke out a career just by being myself and trying to make people laugh, so I feel very lucky… I live in the moment and try not to wish my life away, because time whizzes by and I aim to appreciate where I am right now. When I look back, I can honestly say I don’t really have any regrets – apart from a couple of perms and definitely the odd dress!”

Olympic cyclist Laura Kenny on setting goals, and achieving them:

“Although I’m the most successful female Olympian, I want to go even further. I want to be on the all-time list – not just the female list. My goal is the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, so although we [Kenny and her husband, fellow cyclist Jason] want more children eventually, we won’t be having any more before that.”

TV presenter Anna Richardson on tackling 50:

“If you had ever asked me a few years ago, ‘Did you ever think you would end up with a woman?’, I’d have said no – but I find myself here and I’m very accepting and very, very happy and looking forward to the future.

“Sue [Perkins, Richardson’s partner] and I admit we’re both Alpha females, and so that can cause fireworks in our house if we clash, but that makes it exciting and fun. As I smash headlong into 50, I think it would be great to have a permanent commitment, so I would like us to marry.”

Welsh TV presenter Matt Johnson on how he manages his mental health:

“Seeing a hypnotherapist over the last six months has been wonderful. My entire life, I’ve had what’s like ‘imposter syndrome’ – secret feelings of fear of failure, and not wanting to persevere with things because of not feeling worthy of success…

“Instead of fighting myself and negative feelings, I’m now able to compartmentalise my thoughts and act positively. It’s a real breakthrough.”

Arlene Phillips on ageing gracefully:

“I know how old I am chronologically, but I honestly don’t really know what old age feels like, because I’m still busy, busy, busy working.

Apart from a few things my body doesn’t like – I can’t slam down on my knees any more, because they’ve sustained a bit of damage through years of dancing – I feel the same as I ever did.”

Presenter and former model Katie Piper on finding fulfilment:

“I’m happy where I am at 35. I’m so far away from the incident [Piper suffered an acid attack in 2008] that happened to me – it was a decade ago – and I very much live in the present and plan for the future. The important things for me are stability, consistency and love, and I have that through my family, so that’s a great place to be.

“I’m self-sufficient, but it’s brilliant to have people in your life that you love, who love you and are important to you.”

Actor and comedian Ben Miller on the best advice he’s ever been given:

“Be present in the moment and turn up. That’s not as easy as it sounds, but it’s really true because it’s about valuing things and putting 100% effort into where you are in your life.”

Olympic diver Tom Daley on showing the world his true self:

“I feel lighter and freer now I’ve come out. When you try and hide who you really are and suppress emotions, it’s a big burden and a weight on your shoulders. There’s something so liberating about being able to be truly who you are and it feels great to be my authentic self.”

Singer Louise Redknapp on making the most of things:

“You have to take opportunities and do the best you can. We can be really hard on ourselves and we want to make everything as perfect as possible, which is unrealistic. I’m learning to be the best I can be – whether as a parent or with my job – and to just knuckle down and get on with things.”

Entrepreneur Richard Branson on leaving a legacy:

“When I’m on my death bed, I just want to feel as if I have loved and been loved. I want to be remembered for changing business for the good, making Virgin a fun place to work, for pushing the boundaries of what people think is possible and leaving the world in a little better shape than we found it, for future generations.”

Former rower and Olympian Sir Steve Redgrave on being grateful:

“I’ve learnt that it’s only when things are taken away from you that you realise you took them for granted, and you don’t realise how lucky you are. However, I still see myself as lucky, even with the two conditions I have – ulcerative colitis and diabetes. They’re under control, I have a healthy lifestyle and they don’t rule my life by any stretch of the imagination.”

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