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3 Foods To Naturally Boost Your Serotonin Levels

Whether it’s work, adjusting to post-pandemic life, or the current cost-of-living crisis, research shows almost one in four of us are currently struggling from stress and anxiety, and our diets may not be helping. 

In fact, a study from market leaders of nutritionally complete food, yfood, found that over seven million Brits feel they don’t have enough time during the week to do a full food shop, developing a reliance on junk food as a result of this, with 20% of the population spend more on Deliveroo and other takeout’s. 

Poor nutrition is stated by experts as one of the common causes for serotonin deficiency, a chemical found in the brain, known to impact our mood and is a must for overall health and wellbeing. 

Implementing lifestyle changes can be the first step to leading a happier and healthier life, to that end, yfood discusses how incorporating foods into your diet can help boost your serotonin levels and consequently, your mood.

Here the food-tech innovators, yfood, have outlined the best sources of food that help boost your happy hormone:

Nuts
We’ve all heard it before but nuts are essential in contributing to brain health – packed with concentrated amounts of healthy fat, protein, and fibre sustaining your mental focus for longer.

Further to this, they also keep your stomach feeling fuller for longer which means less snacking in between meals.

Given the finding from yfood’ research that 37% of Britons snack the most between lunch and dinner – nuts might be the best, healthy solution to carry with you!

Salmon
This oily fish is also a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are important for health. These fatty acids can help support strong bones, healthy skin, and eye function. Salmon is also a source of vitamin D, which is essential for strong bones and teeth, and healthy muscles.

Eggs
Eggs contain tryptophan which plays a vital role in the production of serotonin. Meanwhile, egg yolks are also a good source of Vitamin D — with studies showing that people with anxiety and depression tend to have lower levels of Vitamin D.

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